Managing “the fallen” pastor

In reply to a post by my friend Ted Haggard entitled Selling Service.

I am convinced the only thing that restorers have their sights set on is image management and damage control. They are more concerned with perception and potential impact to cover their backside, and their budget, then their interest in actually APPLYING the Gospel.

I appreciate your insights here Ted, I do agree that many have made “restoration” a business. Unfortunately too often those that do try to take credit or profit from income received from “the fallen” (as part of their process of counseling, support, etc…), are also the very same to be reluctant to put their name on the line to vouch for whom they have restored.

The true measure, I believe, is if we are actually willing to be numbered with the sinners: “He was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.”—Isaiah 53:12.

There for sure is no perfect road, but necessary in any model of restoration that has been lacking in the majority of cases is objectivity, grace, and the appropriate knowledge base to be competent. Too often restores define their own self constructed measuring sticks, definitions that absolutely do place not only a burden, but hinder the “fallen.” I am reminded of the “stumbling block” passage in Scripture.

What is needed, is a model of “restoration” that protects the dignity of the spouse, children, community of the “fallen.” After the headlines, or even during the early stages of a process restorers neglect to think through the systemic consequences of their discipline, “restoration plan,” or retraining period. How will the fallen provide for their family? When have you ever heard of a restoration plan considering the practical needs (food, rent, medical… of the spouse or children of a fallen leader? They aren’t they are invisible, and cast aside in self righteous judgment just like the fallen leader.

The church should not be known for this repeated “shooting it’s wounded” practice!

Isn’t the churches job to show up with grace and the Gospel on the worst day, not heap extra burdens on those who are already repentant?

I am convinced the only thing that restorers have their sights set on is image management and damage control. They are more concerned with perception and potential impact to cover their backside, and their budget, then their interest in actually APPLYING the Gospel.

I appreciate your insights here Ted, I do agree that many have made “restoration” a business. Unfortunately too often those that do try to take credit or profit from income received from “the fallen” (as part of their process of counseling, support, etc…), are also the very same to be reluctant to put their name on the line to vouch for whom they have restored.

The true measure, I believe, is if we are actually willing to be numbered with the sinners: “He was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.”—Isaiah 53:12.

There for sure is no perfect road, but necessary in any model of restoration that has been lacking in the majority of cases is objectivity, grace, and the appropriate knowledge base to be competent. Too often restores define their own self constructed measuring sticks, definitions that absolutely do place not only a burden, but hinder the “fallen.” I am reminded of the “stumbling block” passage in Scripture.

What is needed, is a model of “restoration” that protects the dignity of the spouse, children, community of the “fallen.” After the headlines, or even during the early stages of a process restorers neglect to think through the systemic consequences of their discipline, “restoration plan,” or retraining period. How will the fallen provide for their family? When have you ever heard of a restoration plan considering the practical needs (food, rent, medical… of the spouse or children of a fallen leader? They aren’t they are invisible, and cast aside in self righteous judgment just like the fallen leader.

The church should not be known for this repeated “shooting it’s wounded” practice!

Isn’t the churches job to show up with grace and the Gospel on the worst day, not heap extra burdens on those who are already repentant?

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